Who is VCOSS?

VCOSS is the peak representative body for Victoria’s social and community sector, and the state’s leading social advocacy organisation.

We work towards creating a Victoria that is a fair, just and inclusive.

Where nobody is trapped by poverty, and everybody is supported to live a life of wellbeing.

Why wellbeing?

 


How do we work?

Here are just some of the ways.

 


Consulting with members, collecting evidence and analysing trends to develop smart policy proposals for change.


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Using our relationships, influence, community connections and public profile to campaign for fair and just Victoria.


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Working alongside members and other groups to ensure the community sector is strong, well-funded and resilient.


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Media Releases

Nov 24

"The pandemic has made bold interventions a necessity, and the government isn't missing its shot."


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Nov 17

Everybody needs a home that stays cool in summer and warm in winter.


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Nov 15

“A single investment of this scale has not been seen in many decades, if ever. It’s a gamechanger.”


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Issues and Analysis


For some of us, this is life and it does not end.


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We're super proud that Tamara Eldridge has been announced as a Victorian Trainee of the Year finalist! Read about her journey.


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It’s been really difficult, particularly with the lack of certainty.


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Latest policy

VCOSS produces formal submissions to dozens of inquiries and policy development processes each year. These are prepared in consultation with VCOSS members and the broader sector. Stand alone policy reports on topics of significance are also produced. You can view all our work in the VCOSS Policy Library.


All too often education systems do not provide the opportunities and supports learners with disability need to thrive.


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As part of our sector leadership, VCOSS advocates for systemic change to improve the lives of people with disability.


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Green space improves health and wellbeing but its distribution across Victoria is inequitable.


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